SCRATCHING A NICHE: On Whodunits and Hitchcockian Hooey

Considering Sunday is a day of rest, this lazy cuss managed to get a lot done! I had a nice walk along the shore under a bright Indian Summer sky. I replaced all my decrepit plastic storage containers with spiffy new Pyrex bowls. I met the new lady Doctor. I like her, but her debut … Continue reading SCRATCHING A NICHE: On Whodunits and Hitchcockian Hooey

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G.A.DIVERTISSEMENT

Let’s face it: life can’t be all about reading classic mystery after classic mystery, matching wits with Peter Wimsey and Hercule Poirot and Inspector French to solve some puzzles. Sometimes you just have to step back and . . . solve some puzzles! Fortunately, the folks at the British Library are aware of this! They … Continue reading G.A.DIVERTISSEMENT

“IT’S CLOUDS’ ILLUSIONS I RECALL . . . “: The Latest from Paul Halter

I can hardly begin to sort the barrage of thoughts and feelings that have swirled around me like the wind while reading The Man Who Loved Clouds, the latest novel by French author Paul Halter to be translated into English courtesy of John Pugmire and Locked Room International. The announcement several months ago of its … Continue reading “IT’S CLOUDS’ ILLUSIONS I RECALL . . . “: The Latest from Paul Halter

THE BRIDGE TWIXT GAD AND MODERNITY: Christie’s The Body in the Library

The difference between Agatha Christie in the 1920’s and the 1930’s was, in every way, startling. Although she was thirty when she published her first novel, there was something of the gawky girl in Christie’s writing and the tragic romantic in her personal life. Of the nine novels she published between 1920 and 1929, five … Continue reading THE BRIDGE TWIXT GAD AND MODERNITY: Christie’s The Body in the Library