A HUNDRED YEARS OF CHRISTIE: Entr’acte at the Vicarage

Hello, fellow Christie fans! I'm busy working on the next but last chapter of my celebration of the Christie centenary, decade by decade. I need a little more time with the "aughts," so I thought I would distract you with a very good time I recently had talking with Moira (Clothes in Books) and Jim … Continue reading A HUNDRED YEARS OF CHRISTIE: Entr’acte at the Vicarage

A HUNDRED YEARS OF CHRISTIE: Doubtful Devotion in the 90’s

“Even Max admitted that she was elusive. He once said a revealing thing about her to me - that she was an exceptional combination of outer diffidence and inner confidence. Both of these were utterly genuine, like everything about her. It is extraordinary enough that, with all her worldwide fame, she should have been so … Continue reading A HUNDRED YEARS OF CHRISTIE: Doubtful Devotion in the 90’s

A HUNDRED YEARS OF CHRISTIE, PART SEVEN: Mistress of Media in the 80’s

When I was a student, focused on the study of literature and theatre, I learned a hard lesson: there was a schism between those works which are deemed “art” and those classified as “popular culture”. As a child, my love of comic books was derided as . . . well, childish. Studying drama at U.C. … Continue reading A HUNDRED YEARS OF CHRISTIE, PART SEVEN: Mistress of Media in the 80’s

A HUNDRED YEARS OF CHRISTIE, PART SIX: Requiem and Rebirth in the 70’s

“What can I say at seventy-five? ‘Thank God for my good life, and for all the love that has been given to me.’”                                                                                                 Agatha Christie: An Autobiography “It’s sad really, but nowadays one is only interested in the deaths!”                                                                                                 Nemesis (1971) Six Novels Passenger to Frankfurt (1970) Nemesis (1971) Elephants Can Remember (1972) Postern of Fate (1973) Curtain (1975) * Sleeping … Continue reading A HUNDRED YEARS OF CHRISTIE, PART SIX: Requiem and Rebirth in the 70’s

A CENTURY OF AGATHA CHRISTIE, PART FIVE: The Pendulum Swings in the Swinging 60’s

“You know . . . I really can’t think how anyone ever gets away with a murder in real life. It seems to me that the moment you’ve done a murder the whole thing is so terribly obvious. . . The murder part is quite easy and simple. It’s the covering up that’s so difficult. … Continue reading A CENTURY OF AGATHA CHRISTIE, PART FIVE: The Pendulum Swings in the Swinging 60’s

A CENTURY OF AGATHA CHRISTIE, PART THREE: Death – and Depth – in the 1940’s

“There is sometimes a deep chasm between the past and the future. When one has walked in the valley of the shadow of death, and come out of it into the sunshine – then, mon cher, it is a new life that begins . . . The past will not serve . . . “                         Sad Cypress (1940) Thirteen … Continue reading A CENTURY OF AGATHA CHRISTIE, PART THREE: Death – and Depth – in the 1940’s

A CENTURY OF AGATHA CHRISTIE, PART TWO: The Glittering 1930’s

“They say all the world loves a lover – apply that saying to murder and you have an even more infallible truth. No one can fail to be interested in a murder.”                                                                              The Murder at the Vicarage (1930) WORKS Seventeen Novels (as Agatha Christie) The Murder at the Vicarage (1930) The Sittaford Mystery (1931) Peril at End House (1932) … Continue reading A CENTURY OF AGATHA CHRISTIE, PART TWO: The Glittering 1930’s

A CENTURY OF AGATHA CHRISTIE, PART ONE: Roaring into the 1920’s

“Why not make my detective a Belgian? . . . A retired police officer. Not too young a one. What a mistake I made there. The result is that my fictional detective must really be well over a hundred by now.”                                                                          Agatha Christie’s Autobiography WORKS Nine Novels The Mysterious Affair at Styles (1920/21)  The Secret Adversary (1922) The Murder … Continue reading A CENTURY OF AGATHA CHRISTIE, PART ONE: Roaring into the 1920’s